ISE News and Events

With many people stuck inside for months on end, the built environment has played a significant role in the COVID-19 pandemic. With support from a new National Science Foundation grant, a team of engineers and social scientists will study the ways in which that built environment mitigates or exacerbates the pandemic.

Two ISE professors, affiliated Associate Professor Aparna Gupta (PI, Lally) and Assistant Professor Kristen Schell (co-PI), have been awarded a three-year, $2.66 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) PERFORM (Performance-based Energy Resource Feedback, Optimization, and Risk Management) program.

The Class of 1957 Spectrum Award was established in 2017 to honor an Undergraduate Student in SoE with high academic achievement in engineering, coupled with generous service to RPI and the greater Rensselaer community. 

We are pleased to inform that Ana Duque is the recipient of the Class of 1957 Spectrum Award which will be announced at 2020 Commencement Awards.

Ana Gabriela Du is a Colombian Junior IME student and the Co-President of RPI's Alpha Pi Mu-(Industrial and System Engineering Honor Society).

Jennifer Pazour, an associate professor of industrial and systems engineering, has been awarded the 2019 Rensselaer Alumni Association Teaching Award. The Teaching Award was created in 1994 by the Rensselaer Alumni Association Board of Trustees and is designed to recognize current members of the Rensselaer Faculty for their outstanding teaching techniques, contributions to the campus experience and commitment to students. A single award is presented each year, which includes $5,000 to enhance the classroom experience.

Institute News

A small energy harvesting device that can transform subtle mechanical vibrations into electrical energy could be used to power wireless sensors and actuators for use in anything from temperature and occupancy monitoring in smart environments, to biosensing within the human body.
TROY, N.Y. — The harsh conditions that equipment, satellites, and spacecraft are subject to in space pose significant challenges. Electronic systems must be protected from extreme heat and cold, while storage containers holding liquid propellants must be shielded from solar radiation.
A COVID-19 transmission model inspired by gas-phase chemistry is helping the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) forecast COVID-19 deaths across the country. Developed by Yunfeng Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Jeff Ban, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Washington, the model uses fatality data collected by Johns Hopkins University and mobility data collected by Google to predict disease spread based on how much a population is moving within its community.
Bioimaging technologies are the eyes that allow doctors to see inside the body in order to diagnose, treat, and monitor disease.
Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide for men and women. The most common type of heart disease, coronary artery disease, is caused when plaque builds up along the walls of arteries that carry blood to the heart. It is often diagnosed through a cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan, which shows doctors if arteries are narrowing.