ISE News and Events

On March 28, 2018 Alpha Pi Mu, the Honors Society of Industrial Engineers, hosted a trip to Price Chopper's distribution center located in Schenectady, Ny. Mr John Ahl, Inventory Control Summary Supervisor and Katie Kanai '18 held a discussion about distribution services, inventory management, transportation, and industry specific challenges that Price Chopper faces. This was then followed by a tour of the distribution facilities, including inbound and outbound docks, storage racks, and picking systems. They also addressed specific challenges in floral and produce shipments.

Jennifer Pazour honored as recipients of the 2018 Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholar Award represent the caliber of talent that we believe is essential to global innovation today and in future. The Award program, and its distinguished Advisory Board, is part of our company’s commitment to help increase the participation of women in STEM2D fields worldwide,” said Kathy Wengel, Worldwide Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer, Johnson & Johnson Supply Chain and WiSTEM2D Program Executive Sponsor.

Their paper “Interdicting Layered Physical and Information Flow Networks” co-authored with Dr. Chase Rainwater from the University of Arkansas will appear in the April issue of IISE Transactions. This study focuses on an interdiction problem on two interdependent networks. They reformulate this problem using duality and apply this technique to law enforcement efforts against illegal drug trafficking, and cyber-based vulnerability analysis of supply chain networks and infrastructure systems. 

Academic Citation:

ISE faculty, Dr. Jennifer Pazour, has been awarded the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant by the National Science Foundation.  This five-year grant, funded through the NSF Operations Engineering Program, is entitled “CAREER: Distribution Resource Elasticity: A New Hierarchical Approach for On-Demand Distribution Platforms.” 

The video of Professor Daniel Berg being interviewed was recorded over an hour at the INFORMS Conference in Houston last October. The interviewer is Professor Richard C. Larson of MIT. He tries successfully to trace the course of Berg's academic and professional development to see the connection to his becoming a Fellow in INFORMS.

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — Cardboard boxes being delivered to homes and businesses — one, two, even three packages at a time — are as ubiquitous as holiday lights this time of year. While most people enjoy giving and receiving gifts throughout the season, there’s increasing concern over the rise in congestion, emissions, and energy consumption associated with an influx of deliveries. A new survey conducted by a research team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute indicates that some online shoppers are open to receiving packages in another way, if it would help offset this growing problem.
TROY, N.Y. — Power generation, the heat in our homes, air-conditioning, even the manufacturing of some of the products we use each day rely on evaporation and condensation processes. Improving and controlling these phase-change phenomena could increase energy efficiency across a vast number of industries.
TROY, N.Y. — Many technologies that are essential for daily life — from communications to GPS navigation to weather forecasting — rely on the thousands of satellites that are orbiting Earth. When those satellites run out of gas and stop working, there’s not much that can currently be done to fix them.
TROY, N.Y. — Ge Wang, the Clark and Crossan Endowed Chair of biomedical engineering and director of the Biomedical Imaging Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Election to NAI fellow is the highest professional distinction given to academic inventors. It is bestowed on those who have created or facilitated inventions that have improved quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.
By folding snippets of DNA into the shape of a five-pointed star using structural DNA nanotechnology, researchers have created a trap that captures Dengue virus as it floats in the bloodstream.