ISE News and Events

Thomas Sharkey, Associate Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE), will lead an NSF-funded effort to integrate Operations Research (OR), public policy, and social science methods to plan investments into infrastructure in the Arctic in a way that simultaneously improves emergency response capabilities, such as search and rescue and oil spill response, and benefits the local Arctic communities where the infrastructure is built and maintained.

Since becoming Professor Emeritus, Tom Willemain resumed full-time work as Senior VP/Research at his company, Smart Software, Inc. He has also taken up writing. His memoir "Working on the Dark Side of the Moon: Life Inside the National Security Agency" (see TomWillemain.com) was published in 2017.

Thomas Sharkey, Associate Professor, is part of a team that has received a National Science Foundation grant to construct network models of human trafficking networks, with the goal of effectively disrupting them.  The interdisciplinary team will seek to integrate methods from the social sciences and operations research (OR) in order to capture the most salient features of sex trafficking networks and identify significant gaps in the interdiction literature that limits its applicability to disrupting these types of illicit networks.    

Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM) has awarded $1.4 million in project funding to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as part of its first round of funding to strengthen U.S. manufacturing. ARM selected projects that will generate timely impact on the national manufacturing landscape and serve as examples of ARM’s mission.

Jennifer Pazour, assistant professor of industrial and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering’s 24th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering (USFOE) symposium. The symposium will take place Sept. 5-7 at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — The innovations that will enable greener energy systems, next generation computing, artificially intelligent solutions, and even health-care technology are all being developed right now on the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute campus. These solutions are ripe for research and industry partnerships.
Troy, N.Y. — Charles Taylor ’87, ’91, ’92, recognizes that every person’s heart and health are different, which is why he has spent his career focused on developing a personalized approach to diagnosing and treating cardiovascular disease. His visionary work as the co-founder of HeartFlow Inc. is one of the reasons that, later this week, Taylor will be awarded the Davies Medal for Engineering Achievement from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
TROY, N.Y. — Improving the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases like cancer will require more detailed, rapid, and agile imaging technology that can show doctors not just what a specific organ looks like, but also what’s happening within the cells that make up those tissues.
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have been working on two fronts to perfect continuous blood glucose monitor and insulin pump technologies: they are developing algorithms to create a closed-loop system that can effectively operate similar to a healthy pancreas, and they are working to make that system more accessible and understandable for users with diabetes.
Recent work by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is demonstrating how data from online games can help provide meaningful insights.