ISE News and Events

William (Al) Wallace co-authored a recent article in the National Academy of Engineering magazine, “The Bridge”, on the ethical challenges inherent in the building and using of computational models.

ISE faculty Jennifer Pazour has been selected to receive the prestigious Dr. Hamed K. Eldin Outstanding Early Career IE in Academia Award.  This award recognizes individuals in academia who have demonstrated outstanding characteristics in education, leadership, professionalism and potential in industrial engineering. The award recognizes engineering contributions in application, design, research or development of IE methods by early career IISE members.  Dr.

There is inherent tension between meeting customer service expectation and minimizing inventory investment. ISE Emeritus Faculty Tom Willemain, also co-founder and Senior VP for Research at Smart Software, describes in his recent article in American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) magazine, the use of data to better characterize customer demand, and optimize the inventory management. Prof.

An invention "US 7177798 B2 Natural Language Interface Using Constrained Intermediate Dictionary of Results" by ISE professor, Cheng Hsu, and his former graduate student, Veera Boonjing, is at the center of a patent infringement case brought by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Marathon Patent Group over the technology used in the iPhone's Siri app. This case was settled in early June for $24.9M to be shared between Rensselaer and Marathon.

ISE Faculty Jennifer Pazour and co-authors Debjit Roy and Rene De Koster received an honorable mention designation in the IIE Transactions Focused Issue on Design and Manufacturing Best Applications Paper Award Competition for 2016. This award is selected by an examining committee from all papers published from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015, issues 46:7 through 47:6. The paper may be downloaded from IIE: Roy, Debjit, Jennifer A. Pazour, and René De Koster.

Institute News

The day Laura Antoniello attended a campus job fair at Rensselaer Polytechnic Instititue changed everything. She was an electronic media, arts, and communication (EMAC) major and the fair was geared for engineering jobs. But Hasbro was at the event and Antoniello was really interested in working at the company, having grown up near its headquarters. The Hasbro recruiter gave her valuable pointers.
In high school, Joseph Vengen faced adversity and suffering every day. Born completely deaf, he received his first cochlear implant as a toddler. The technology opened doors but has limitations in noisy environments.
Powerful hurricanes and earthquakes have wreaked havoc in the United States and around the world in recent years, often leaving people stranded for months and even years without access to water, food, and shelter. A unique collaborative project at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute seeks to provide a sustainable solution, while also considering the environment.
Heat pipes are devices to keep critical equipment from overheating. They transfer heat from one point to another through an evaporation-condensation process and are used in everything from cell phones and laptops to air conditioners and spacecraft.   Normally, heat pipes contain porous metal wicks that return liquid to the heated end of the pipe where it evaporates. But engineers are working to develop wickless heat pipes that are lighter and more reliable. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute initiated the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) project to study these wickless heat pipes for use in near-zero gravity environments for aerospace applications.  
Aquaporins are proteins that serve as water channels to regulate the flow of water across biological cell membranes. They also remove excess salt and impurities in the body, and it is this aspect that has led to much interest in recent years in how to mimic the biochemical processes of aquaporins potentially for water desalination systems.   An international team of researchers co-led by Georges Belfort has discovered water, in the form of “water wires,” contained in another molecule—the imidazole—a nitrogen-based organic compound that could be used as a potential building block for artificial aquaporins. The findings were recently published in Science Advances by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Belfort is Institute Professor and professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.